Topic: scanning-electron-microscope

70 Years of Electron Microscopy: The History of the Thermo Scientific Phenom Desktop Scanning Electron Microscope

By Rose Helweg - June 18, 2019

About 70 years ago, Philips built its first commercial electron microscope. This microscope made electron microscopy available to researchers worldwide. Now, 70 years later, electron microscopy plays a fundamental role in research done in various fields, ranging from materials science to life sciences. A big role in making electron microscopy accessible to everybody is played by the Phenom Desktop SEM, originally launched in 2006

About 70 years ago, Philips built its first commercial electron microscope. This microscope made electron microscopy available to researchers worldwide. Now, 70 years later, electron microscopy plays a fundamental role in research done in various fields, ranging from materials science to life sciences. A big role in making electron microscopy accessible to everybody is played by the Phenom Desktop SEM, originally launched in 2006

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Spot size in scanning electron microscopy (SEM): why it matters!

By Antonis Nanakoudis - May 9, 2019

Scanning electron microscopes have emerged as a very valuable characterization method in recent years, following the major technological developments and the continuous shrinking of material dimensions. SEMs are versatile tools that allow users to perform many different types of analyses on a wide range of materials and to achieve the best results, users should carefully select the main microscope settings. One of those settings is the spot size, i.e. the diameter of the probe at the sample. In this blog, I explain how to adjust the spot size in a SEM — and how to achieve the right balance between high-resolution imaging and a high beam current to get the results you’re looking for.

Scanning electron microscopes have emerged as a very valuable characterization method in recent years, following the major technological developments and the continuous shrinking of material dimensions. SEMs are versatile tools that allow users to perform many different types of analyses on a wide range of materials and to achieve the best results, users should carefully select the main microscope settings. One of those settings is the spot size, i.e. the diameter of the probe at the sample. In this blog, I explain how to adjust the spot size in a SEM — and how to achieve the right balance between high-resolution imaging and a high beam current to get the results you’re looking for.

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How to spot astigmatism in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images

By Willem van Zyl - February 28, 2019

You may have heard of astigmatism as a medical condition that causes visual impairment in up to 40% of adults [1], but how is this applicable to electron microscopy? First of all, let’s talk about what the word astigmatism, in fact, means: It is derived from the negative prefix ‘a’ (without) + ‘stigmat-’ (mark, or point, in Ancient Greek) + ‘ism’ (condition). In a perfect optical system, a lens has only one focal point, and is stigmatic. When the lens has more than one focal point, however, we refer to the lens as being astigmatic. This happens when the lens is elongated in either the sagittal (y-axis) or tangential (x-axis) plane, resulting in two focal points (= foci).

You may have heard of astigmatism as a medical condition that causes visual impairment in up to 40% of adults [1], but how is this applicable to electron microscopy? First of all, let’s talk about what the word astigmatism, in fact, means: It is derived from the negative prefix ‘a’ (without) + ‘stigmat-’ (mark, or point, in Ancient Greek) + ‘ism’ (condition). In a perfect optical system, a lens has only one focal point, and is stigmatic. When the lens has more than one focal point, however, we refer to the lens as being astigmatic. This happens when the lens is elongated in either the sagittal (y-axis) or tangential (x-axis) plane, resulting in two focal points (= foci).

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SEM: types of electrons, their detection and the information they provide

By Antonis Nanakoudis - February 21, 2019

https://discover.phenom-world.com/sem-working-principleElectron microscopes are very versatile instruments, which can provide different types of information depending on the user’s needs. In this blog we will describe the different types of electrons that are produced in a SEM, how they are detected and the type of information that they can provide.

https://discover.phenom-world.com/sem-working-principleElectron microscopes are very versatile instruments, which can provide different types of information depending on the user’s needs. In this blog we will describe the different types of electrons that are produced in a SEM, how they are detected and the type of information that they can provide.

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Phenom Pharos Desktop SEM wins Analytical Scientist Innovation Award 2018!

By Rose Helweg - January 18, 2019

The Thermo Scientific™ Phenom Pharos Desktop SEM has been voted second place in the Analytical Scientist Innovation Awards 2018! The microscope—which was introduced in August 2018—is the flagship of the Phenom Desktop SEM product range.

The Thermo Scientific™ Phenom Pharos Desktop SEM has been voted second place in the Analytical Scientist Innovation Awards 2018! The microscope—which was introduced in August 2018—is the flagship of the Phenom Desktop SEM product range.

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Everything is nano these days: to improve the world of nanotechnology we make extremely fast SEM imaging and analysis accessible to everyone

By Karl Kersten - December 20, 2018

Imaging with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is a powerful tool for any materials scientist, though historically, accessing the technique was an issue. SEM involved using large, expensive systems that were only available to large research institutions. Even then, access was often difficult, due to long waiting lists and because their complex operation required in-depth training.

Imaging with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is a powerful tool for any materials scientist, though historically, accessing the technique was an issue. SEM involved using large, expensive systems that were only available to large research institutions. Even then, access was often difficult, due to long waiting lists and because their complex operation required in-depth training.

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FEG source: what you need to know

By Karl Kersten - November 26, 2018

Until very recently, we have not seen a high kilovolt (kV) imaging desktop scanning electron microscope (SEM) with a Field Emission Gun (FEG) source in it. Why not? And why can it be useful to have a FEG source in a desktop SEM? This article provides some answers.

Until very recently, we have not seen a high kilovolt (kV) imaging desktop scanning electron microscope (SEM) with a Field Emission Gun (FEG) source in it. Why not? And why can it be useful to have a FEG source in a desktop SEM? This article provides some answers.

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Backscattered electron imaging explained

By Karl Kersten - October 4, 2018

 Backscattered electrons (BSEs) are generated by elastic scattering events. When the electrons in the primary beam travel close to the atom’s nuclei in the specimen, their trajectory is deviated due to the force they feel with the positive charges in the nuclei. Depending on the size of the atom nuclei, the number of backscattered electrons differs. This is the basic principle of BSE image contrast. In this blog we introduce the backscattering coefficient and explain how it is influenced by the inclination of the sample and the primary beam energy.

 Backscattered electrons (BSEs) are generated by elastic scattering events. When the electrons in the primary beam travel close to the atom’s nuclei in the specimen, their trajectory is deviated due to the force they feel with the positive charges in the nuclei. Depending on the size of the atom nuclei, the number of backscattered electrons differs. This is the basic principle of BSE image contrast. In this blog we introduce the backscattering coefficient and explain how it is influenced by the inclination of the sample and the primary beam energy.

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Backscattered electron images: how to improve their quality

By Karl Kersten - September 21, 2018

Backscatter electrons (BSEs) carry information on the material of the sample. Obtaining high-quality images with a backscattered electron detector depends on many factors, such as the conductivity of the sample, its morphology and composition, the type of BSE detector and the electronics. Given a fixed system with the same detector and electronics— and the same sample, we analyzed the factors that play a role in the quality of a BSE image. Beginning with the number of integrating frames and beam intensity, in this blog we will also discuss the roles of the working distance and the chamber pressure.

Backscatter electrons (BSEs) carry information on the material of the sample. Obtaining high-quality images with a backscattered electron detector depends on many factors, such as the conductivity of the sample, its morphology and composition, the type of BSE detector and the electronics. Given a fixed system with the same detector and electronics— and the same sample, we analyzed the factors that play a role in the quality of a BSE image. Beginning with the number of integrating frames and beam intensity, in this blog we will also discuss the roles of the working distance and the chamber pressure.

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Tungsten vs. CeB6 electron source: Choosing the right desktop SEM

By Wouter Arts - September 13, 2018

Considering a desktop scanning electron microscope (SEM)? If so, then it is important to determine what type of electron source fits your needs, since it has a direct effect on the quality of your output. In this blog, we'll therefore describe compare a Tungsten electron source with a CeB6 electron source. Read on to learn to discover which electron source is most suitable for a desktop SEM.

Considering a desktop scanning electron microscope (SEM)? If so, then it is important to determine what type of electron source fits your needs, since it has a direct effect on the quality of your output. In this blog, we'll therefore describe compare a Tungsten electron source with a CeB6 electron source. Read on to learn to discover which electron source is most suitable for a desktop SEM.

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