Karl Kersten

Karl Kersten is head of the Application team at Thermo Fisher Scientific, the world leader in serving science. He is passionate about the Thermo Fisher Scientific product and likes converting customer requirements into product or feature specifications so customers can achieve their goals.

Desktop SEM electron sources: why CeB6 is the right choice

By Karl Kersten - April 4, 2019

If you’re looking for a scanning electron microscope (SEM), you probably know by now that the electron source is one of the most important parts of the system. In a previous blog, we talked about the properties of three different electron sources: the Tungsten, CeB6 and FEG sourcesIn this blog, we’ll take a closer look at Tungsten and CeB6 electron sources.

If you’re looking for a scanning electron microscope (SEM), you probably know by now that the electron source is one of the most important parts of the system. In a previous blog, we talked about the properties of three different electron sources: the Tungsten, CeB6 and FEG sourcesIn this blog, we’ll take a closer look at Tungsten and CeB6 electron sources.

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How scanning electron microscopy impacts dental studies

By Karl Kersten - March 13, 2019

Microscopy is known to be a versatile tool in dental studies. Not only is optical microscopy used in day-to-day practices in dental clinics, but due to the surface information electron microscopy offers, it is used within a large variety of research subjects. With the following examples we want to offer more insights into how in detail scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is utilized within various dental studies.

Microscopy is known to be a versatile tool in dental studies. Not only is optical microscopy used in day-to-day practices in dental clinics, but due to the surface information electron microscopy offers, it is used within a large variety of research subjects. With the following examples we want to offer more insights into how in detail scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is utilized within various dental studies.

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Topics: Life Sciences

Microscopic investigation of embedded samples

By Karl Kersten - January 31, 2019

The purpose of embedding is to protect fragile or coated materials during preparation, and to obtain good edge retention. Embedding is also used to produce specimens of a uniform size, such as minerals, clay or other particles and can also be used to section a material and investigate its interior.

The purpose of embedding is to protect fragile or coated materials during preparation, and to obtain good edge retention. Embedding is also used to produce specimens of a uniform size, such as minerals, clay or other particles and can also be used to section a material and investigate its interior.

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Everything is nano these days: to improve the world of nanotechnology we make extremely fast SEM imaging and analysis accessible to everyone

By Karl Kersten - December 20, 2018

Imaging with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is a powerful tool for any materials scientist, though historically, accessing the technique was an issue. SEM involved using large, expensive systems that were only available to large research institutions. Even then, access was often difficult, due to long waiting lists and because their complex operation required in-depth training.

Imaging with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is a powerful tool for any materials scientist, though historically, accessing the technique was an issue. SEM involved using large, expensive systems that were only available to large research institutions. Even then, access was often difficult, due to long waiting lists and because their complex operation required in-depth training.

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Imaging fibers with a SEM: how to obtain a flawless quality analysis

By Karl Kersten - December 6, 2018

In our daily life, we make use of a large amount of objects and devices that are produced from fibers. Fibers are usually imaged in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), which provides high-resolution images, elemental analysis, and the possibility of automatically measuring thousands of fibers in mere minutes.

But in some cases, imaging fibers with a SEM also presents challenges, as the nature of some fibers might compromise the quality of your analysis. With this in mind, this blog describes how you can obtain a high analysis quality through proper SEM configuration and sample preparation. 

In our daily life, we make use of a large amount of objects and devices that are produced from fibers. Fibers are usually imaged in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), which provides high-resolution images, elemental analysis, and the possibility of automatically measuring thousands of fibers in mere minutes.

But in some cases, imaging fibers with a SEM also presents challenges, as the nature of some fibers might compromise the quality of your analysis. With this in mind, this blog describes how you can obtain a high analysis quality through proper SEM configuration and sample preparation. 

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FEG source: what you need to know

By Karl Kersten - November 26, 2018

Until very recently, we have not seen a high kilovolt (kV) imaging desktop scanning electron microscope (SEM) with a Field Emission Gun (FEG) source in it. Why not? And why can it be useful to have a FEG source in a desktop SEM? This article provides some answers.

Until very recently, we have not seen a high kilovolt (kV) imaging desktop scanning electron microscope (SEM) with a Field Emission Gun (FEG) source in it. Why not? And why can it be useful to have a FEG source in a desktop SEM? This article provides some answers.

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How research on new material can help minimize environmental damage

By Karl Kersten - November 8, 2018

In science, efforts are rising exploring options that help minimize environmental damage. To understand how environmental damage can be minimized it is worthwhile to research new materials. We would like to show you an example taken from fiber development to illustrate the possibilities new materials provide. This example is particularly interesting for anyone working in the materials science field.

In science, efforts are rising exploring options that help minimize environmental damage. To understand how environmental damage can be minimized it is worthwhile to research new materials. We would like to show you an example taken from fiber development to illustrate the possibilities new materials provide. This example is particularly interesting for anyone working in the materials science field.

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How sample preparation for SEM helps lab operators produce images faster

By Karl Kersten - November 1, 2018

As a seasoned lab operator, you work with microscopes for the majority of the day, and are very specialized in sample preparation and handling the SEM system. And it’s a responsible job: your output leads to the overall improvement of your company’s products and company results. Therefore, the quality of your work must be outstanding. But at the same time, you want to deliver output quickly. 

As a seasoned lab operator, you work with microscopes for the majority of the day, and are very specialized in sample preparation and handling the SEM system. And it’s a responsible job: your output leads to the overall improvement of your company’s products and company results. Therefore, the quality of your work must be outstanding. But at the same time, you want to deliver output quickly. 

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How SEM helps to detect additive manufacturing defects in a 3D-printed object

By Karl Kersten - October 11, 2018

3D printing, or additive manufacturing (AM), refers to processes that are used to make 3D printed objects. In order to achieve this, successive layers of material are formed under computer control to create an object. The objects can have almost any shape or geometry and are produced using digital data from a 3D model or other electronic data source.

But successive layers formed under computer control can result in structural interruptions or defects that negatively affect the reliability of an 3D printed object. And these undesirable defects  should not go undetected; something we discuss in this blog later on. But first, more about 3D printing.

3D printing, or additive manufacturing (AM), refers to processes that are used to make 3D printed objects. In order to achieve this, successive layers of material are formed under computer control to create an object. The objects can have almost any shape or geometry and are produced using digital data from a 3D model or other electronic data source.

But successive layers formed under computer control can result in structural interruptions or defects that negatively affect the reliability of an 3D printed object. And these undesirable defects  should not go undetected; something we discuss in this blog later on. But first, more about 3D printing.

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Backscattered electron imaging explained

By Karl Kersten - October 4, 2018

 Backscattered electrons (BSEs) are generated by elastic scattering events. When the electrons in the primary beam travel close to the atom’s nuclei in the specimen, their trajectory is deviated due to the force they feel with the positive charges in the nuclei. Depending on the size of the atom nuclei, the number of backscattered electrons differs. This is the basic principle of BSE image contrast. In this blog we introduce the backscattering coefficient and explain how it is influenced by the inclination of the sample and the primary beam energy.

 Backscattered electrons (BSEs) are generated by elastic scattering events. When the electrons in the primary beam travel close to the atom’s nuclei in the specimen, their trajectory is deviated due to the force they feel with the positive charges in the nuclei. Depending on the size of the atom nuclei, the number of backscattered electrons differs. This is the basic principle of BSE image contrast. In this blog we introduce the backscattering coefficient and explain how it is influenced by the inclination of the sample and the primary beam energy.

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