Topic: scanning-electron-microscope-software

Do you have repetitive SEM work? Use automated SEM analysis!

By Ruud Bernsen - Nov 6, 2018

Obtaining images is what it is all about in the microscopy business. While searching for that one particle or defect is part of the job, doing this for hundreds of particles or samples is time-consuming work and might not be very challenging. So why not automate your SEM analysis?

Obtaining images is what it is all about in the microscopy business. While searching for that one particle or defect is part of the job, doing this for hundreds of particles or samples is time-consuming work and might not be very challenging. So why not automate your SEM analysis?

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SEM automation guidelines for small script development: simulation and reporting

By Wouter Arts - Oct 18, 2018

Scripts are small automated software tools that can help a scanning electron microscope (SEM) user work more efficiently. In my previous blogs, I have explained how we can use the Phenom SEM with the Phenom programmable interface (PPI) to automate the process of acquiring, analyzing and evaluating images. In this blog, I will add the Phenom PPI simulator to that and explain how you can generate and export reports using PPI. 

Scripts are small automated software tools that can help a scanning electron microscope (SEM) user work more efficiently. In my previous blogs, I have explained how we can use the Phenom SEM with the Phenom programmable interface (PPI) to automate the process of acquiring, analyzing and evaluating images. In this blog, I will add the Phenom PPI simulator to that and explain how you can generate and export reports using PPI. 

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SEM technology: the role of the electron beam voltage in electron microscopy analysis

By Luigi Raspolini - Jul 6, 2018

When conducting electron microscopy (EM) analysis, there are a few important parameters that must be taken into account to produce the best possible results, and to image the feature of interest. One of the crucial roles is played by the voltage (or tension) applied to the source electrodes to generate the electron beam. Historically, the trend has always been to increase the voltage to improve the resolution of the system.

It is only in recent years that scanning electron microscope (SEM) producers have started to focus on improving the resolution at lower voltages. A major role in this has been the expanding field of application of EM to the life sciences - especially after the introduction of the Nobel prize-winning cryo-SEM technique. This blog will focus on the effects of the voltage on the results of electron microscopy analysis.


When conducting electron microscopy (EM) analysis, there are a few important parameters that must be taken into account to produce the best possible results, and to image the feature of interest. One of the crucial roles is played by the voltage (or tension) applied to the source electrodes to generate the electron beam. Historically, the trend has always been to increase the voltage to improve the resolution of the system.

It is only in recent years that scanning electron microscope (SEM) producers have started to focus on improving the resolution at lower voltages. A major role in this has been the expanding field of application of EM to the life sciences - especially after the introduction of the Nobel prize-winning cryo-SEM technique. This blog will focus on the effects of the voltage on the results of electron microscopy analysis.


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The Phenom Process Automation: mixing backscattered and secondary electron images using a Python script

By Marijke Scotuzzi - Jun 28, 2018

When the primary beam interacts with the sample, backscattered electrons (BSEs) and secondary electrons (SEs) are generated. Images of the samples obtained by detecting the emitted signals, carry information on the composition (for BSE signals) and on the topography (for SE signals). How are BSEs and SEs formed and why do they carry specific information? Moreover, is it possible to get both compositional and topographical information in one image? And how flexible is this solution? In this blog, I will answer these questions and introduce a script that allows users to mix their own images.

When the primary beam interacts with the sample, backscattered electrons (BSEs) and secondary electrons (SEs) are generated. Images of the samples obtained by detecting the emitted signals, carry information on the composition (for BSE signals) and on the topography (for SE signals). How are BSEs and SEs formed and why do they carry specific information? Moreover, is it possible to get both compositional and topographical information in one image? And how flexible is this solution? In this blog, I will answer these questions and introduce a script that allows users to mix their own images.

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How SEM analysis helps understanding new nanofiber applications

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Oct 26, 2017

How to transfer drugs into human bodies efficient and while doing that minimizing side effects, has been studied intensively, and many different techniques have been developed over the past few years. Electrospun nanofibers are one of such new systems that have attracted a lot of attention recently. This is thanks to the exceptional properties of these fibers: they have highly porous three-dimensional surfaces, a high surface-to-volume ratio, and interconnected porosity with tunable pore dimensions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) proved to be helpful as an analytical tool to understand how fiber properties can be altered and enhanced.

 

How to transfer drugs into human bodies efficient and while doing that minimizing side effects, has been studied intensively, and many different techniques have been developed over the past few years. Electrospun nanofibers are one of such new systems that have attracted a lot of attention recently. This is thanks to the exceptional properties of these fibers: they have highly porous three-dimensional surfaces, a high surface-to-volume ratio, and interconnected porosity with tunable pore dimensions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) proved to be helpful as an analytical tool to understand how fiber properties can be altered and enhanced.

 

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The power and potential of a programmable interface for desktop SEMs

By Ruud Bernsen - Jul 20, 2017

In previous blogs, I have written about automating large applications. But automation can also make the smaller tasks  quicker and easier for an operator. Behind every button on the menu, there is a command that is activated in code. The Phenom Programming Interface (PPI) gives you access to those commands, enabling you to write your own scripts. In this blog, I will cover a few simple examples of what you can do with PPI.

In previous blogs, I have written about automating large applications. But automation can also make the smaller tasks  quicker and easier for an operator. Behind every button on the menu, there is a command that is activated in code. The Phenom Programming Interface (PPI) gives you access to those commands, enabling you to write your own scripts. In this blog, I will cover a few simple examples of what you can do with PPI.

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How SEM helps analyze morphologies for nanofibers efficiently

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Mar 9, 2017

Most of us may not be aware, but we are constantly surrounded by fibers. From tissue engineering to diapers, high technology filters are part of our daily lives. Many common, inexpensive polymers can be processed on a large scale into flexible materials. But not every produced fibrous material is ready for usage, such as in electronic devices, and further alterations of the material are needed. This blog will give you an insight into how scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can be used in the context of various nano-engineered fibers.

Most of us may not be aware, but we are constantly surrounded by fibers. From tissue engineering to diapers, high technology filters are part of our daily lives. Many common, inexpensive polymers can be processed on a large scale into flexible materials. But not every produced fibrous material is ready for usage, such as in electronic devices, and further alterations of the material are needed. This blog will give you an insight into how scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can be used in the context of various nano-engineered fibers.

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