Topic: automated-sem-workflows

SEM automation guidelines for small script development: simulation and reporting

By Wouter Arts - Oct 18, 2018

Scripts are small automated software tools that can help a scanning electron microscope (SEM) user work more efficiently. In my previous blogs, I have explained how we can use the Phenom SEM with the Phenom programmable interface (PPI) to automate the process of acquiring, analyzing and evaluating images. In this blog, I will add the Phenom PPI simulator to that and explain how you can generate and export reports using PPI. 

Scripts are small automated software tools that can help a scanning electron microscope (SEM) user work more efficiently. In my previous blogs, I have explained how we can use the Phenom SEM with the Phenom programmable interface (PPI) to automate the process of acquiring, analyzing and evaluating images. In this blog, I will add the Phenom PPI simulator to that and explain how you can generate and export reports using PPI. 

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Automated scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging: how it's used

By Karl Kersten - Aug 16, 2018

In a previous blog, we described how automating scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging saves researchers and operators valuable time. A lot of scanning electron microscope users use this for a wide range of purposes. This blog shows an example of how automated SEM imaging is used in the field: it details performing an automated Laser-Induced Damage Threshold test (LIDT).

In a previous blog, we described how automating scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging saves researchers and operators valuable time. A lot of scanning electron microscope users use this for a wide range of purposes. This blog shows an example of how automated SEM imaging is used in the field: it details performing an automated Laser-Induced Damage Threshold test (LIDT).

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SEM automation guidelines for small script development: evaluation

By Wouter Arts - Jul 26, 2018

Scripts are small automated software tools that can help a scanning electron microscope (SEM) user work more efficiently In my previous two blogs, I wrote about image acquisition and analysis with the Phenom Programming Interface (PPI). In this blog I will explain how we can use the physical properties we obtained in the last blog in the evaluation step.

Scripts are small automated software tools that can help a scanning electron microscope (SEM) user work more efficiently In my previous two blogs, I wrote about image acquisition and analysis with the Phenom Programming Interface (PPI). In this blog I will explain how we can use the physical properties we obtained in the last blog in the evaluation step.

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SEM automation guidelines for small script development: image analysis

By Wouter Arts - Jul 12, 2018

Scripts are small automated software tools that can help a scanning electron microscope (SEM) user with their work. In my previous blog I wrote about how SEM images can be acquired with the Phenom Programming Interface (PPI) using a small script. In this blog I will explain how to extract physical properties from those SEM images.

Scripts are small automated software tools that can help a scanning electron microscope (SEM) user with their work. In my previous blog I wrote about how SEM images can be acquired with the Phenom Programming Interface (PPI) using a small script. In this blog I will explain how to extract physical properties from those SEM images.

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The Phenom Process Automation: mixing backscattered and secondary electron images using a Python script

By Marijke Scotuzzi - Jun 28, 2018

When the primary beam interacts with the sample, backscattered electrons (BSEs) and secondary electrons (SEs) are generated. Images of the samples obtained by detecting the emitted signals, carry information on the composition (for BSE signals) and on the topography (for SE signals). How are BSEs and SEs formed and why do they carry specific information? Moreover, is it possible to get both compositional and topographical information in one image? And how flexible is this solution? In this blog, I will answer these questions and introduce a script that allows users to mix their own images.

When the primary beam interacts with the sample, backscattered electrons (BSEs) and secondary electrons (SEs) are generated. Images of the samples obtained by detecting the emitted signals, carry information on the composition (for BSE signals) and on the topography (for SE signals). How are BSEs and SEs formed and why do they carry specific information? Moreover, is it possible to get both compositional and topographical information in one image? And how flexible is this solution? In this blog, I will answer these questions and introduce a script that allows users to mix their own images.

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Guidelines for small script development: image acquisition

By Wouter Arts - May 24, 2018

Scripts are small software tools that help a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) operator in their daily work. It can be used to automate a repetitive task, to scan large areas quickly, or to obtain a higher repeatability between measurements. To do this a software script must be developed. In this blog we will give guidelines how to develop a small script.

Scripts are small software tools that help a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) operator in their daily work. It can be used to automate a repetitive task, to scan large areas quickly, or to obtain a higher repeatability between measurements. To do this a software script must be developed. In this blog we will give guidelines how to develop a small script.

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How to create custom software solutions for the Phenom desktop SEM

By Wouter Arts - Apr 12, 2018

In many cases, the Phenom SEM is used in industrial and academical applications that require repetitive work, such as acquiring a set of images at pre-set locations. In other cases, it is necessary to scan the entire surface of a sample to find a single particle and record its location and dimensions. This kind of workflow can be automated to increase not only throughput but also efficiency and accuracy. Furthermore, because automated scripts always follow the exact same procedure, the results become more repeatable, and the subjective human interpretation is removed.

In this, and many other cases, the Phenom Programming Interface (PPI) can be used to automate this work. In this blog we explain what PPI is and how it can be used to integrate the Phenom SEM into your workflow.

 

In many cases, the Phenom SEM is used in industrial and academical applications that require repetitive work, such as acquiring a set of images at pre-set locations. In other cases, it is necessary to scan the entire surface of a sample to find a single particle and record its location and dimensions. This kind of workflow can be automated to increase not only throughput but also efficiency and accuracy. Furthermore, because automated scripts always follow the exact same procedure, the results become more repeatable, and the subjective human interpretation is removed.

In this, and many other cases, the Phenom Programming Interface (PPI) can be used to automate this work. In this blog we explain what PPI is and how it can be used to integrate the Phenom SEM into your workflow.

 

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How SEM helps perform automated quality control on phosphate coatings

By Marijke Scotuzzi - Mar 16, 2018

We are surrounded by products that, for either decorative or functional purposes, are covered with coatings; from paintings and lacquers, to adhesive or protective coatings, optical, catalytic or insulating coatings. Of all these coatings, conversion phosphate coatings play an important role, especially in the automotive industry: they are used for corrosion resistance and lubricity. Since these coatings are used for critical parts, the coating process must undergo thorough quality checks. These checks consist of the analysis of the morphology of the coating as well as the percentage of coverage. In this blog, we describe and analyze how automated tools combined with SEMs can be helpful in quality checking phosphate coatings.

We are surrounded by products that, for either decorative or functional purposes, are covered with coatings; from paintings and lacquers, to adhesive or protective coatings, optical, catalytic or insulating coatings. Of all these coatings, conversion phosphate coatings play an important role, especially in the automotive industry: they are used for corrosion resistance and lubricity. Since these coatings are used for critical parts, the coating process must undergo thorough quality checks. These checks consist of the analysis of the morphology of the coating as well as the percentage of coverage. In this blog, we describe and analyze how automated tools combined with SEMs can be helpful in quality checking phosphate coatings.

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