Dr. Jasmin Zahn

Dr. Jasmin Zahn is an Application Engineer at Phenom-World, the world’s no 1 supplier of desktop scanning electron microscopes. She is highly engaged in finding out more about the possibilities for Phenom-World products in various applications. In addition, Jasmin is active in sharing best practices with the outside world to encourage them to look outside their standard scope of use and to improve in their work.

How scanning electron microscopy is used for cosmetics research and development

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Mar 29, 2018

Since ancient Egyptian times, cosmetic products have been used to enhance the human appearance. Research around cosmetics therefore deals not only with the development of new substances and the analysis and enhancement of existing ones, but also with the interaction of components with tissue. In this short blog, we introduce you to three examples that show the link between research within the cosmetic industry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

 

Since ancient Egyptian times, cosmetic products have been used to enhance the human appearance. Research around cosmetics therefore deals not only with the development of new substances and the analysis and enhancement of existing ones, but also with the interaction of components with tissue. In this short blog, we introduce you to three examples that show the link between research within the cosmetic industry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

 

Read more

How scanning electron microscopy fuels biomedical research

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Mar 15, 2018

Biomedical research is a wide field. It describes an area of science devoted to the study of the processes of life, the prevention and treatment of diseases, and the genetic and environmental factors related to diseases and health. And since the field is so diverse, its range of investigation equipment is too. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is one of those types of equipment, and is used to describe tissue or organ structures to gain insights into possible alterations and diseases. To show the variety of topics explored with a SEM — demonstrating its power and vast range of applications — this blog will introduce you to three scientific studies.

 

Biomedical research is a wide field. It describes an area of science devoted to the study of the processes of life, the prevention and treatment of diseases, and the genetic and environmental factors related to diseases and health. And since the field is so diverse, its range of investigation equipment is too. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is one of those types of equipment, and is used to describe tissue or organ structures to gain insights into possible alterations and diseases. To show the variety of topics explored with a SEM — demonstrating its power and vast range of applications — this blog will introduce you to three scientific studies.

 

Read more

Scanning electron microscopy and pharmaceutical research topics

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Mar 1, 2018

Pharmaceutical research and questions linked to drug development and applications is a very diverse topic. Also the instrumentation involved in research and development is just as diverse. In this blog we will focus on the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in three different research topics.

Pharmaceutical research and questions linked to drug development and applications is a very diverse topic. Also the instrumentation involved in research and development is just as diverse. In this blog we will focus on the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in three different research topics.

Read more

Food science research: how scanning electron microscopy is used

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Jan 25, 2018

In food sciences, researchers face many different and challenging microscopy tasks: from particle and fiber analysis, to food preservation, food microbiology and food pathogens. Many different microscopy techniques are used within food science. Food science research and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been strongly related for many years. SEM can be used in various studies from herbs to fruits, and from engineered food to natural components. This blog should offer you some insights into how SEM is used and what benefits and challenges go along with its use.

In food sciences, researchers face many different and challenging microscopy tasks: from particle and fiber analysis, to food preservation, food microbiology and food pathogens. Many different microscopy techniques are used within food science. Food science research and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been strongly related for many years. SEM can be used in various studies from herbs to fruits, and from engineered food to natural components. This blog should offer you some insights into how SEM is used and what benefits and challenges go along with its use.

Read more
Topics: Life Sciences

How scanning electron microscopy is used for cell biology research

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Dec 28, 2017

Although the very first electron microscopy (EM) images of eukaryotic cells were attributed in 1945, it was the Ruska family that not only developed the EM, but also pioneered in the field of infections with pictures of bacteria and viruses. It took until 1949 until the cell’s internal structures were first shown when samples for the first time were embedded in plastic to enable thin sections and.

In early studies the focus was set on cellular organelles. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum were the first organelles to be described in greater detail. Brain tissue observations on a cellular structure were also started as a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) project. During the times of intense research using TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was only just beginning to appear as a tool for imaging surface topography, until it was brought to light in the 1960s and 1970s [1]. This blog should offer you some insights into recent projects involving SEM in cell biological applications.

Although the very first electron microscopy (EM) images of eukaryotic cells were attributed in 1945, it was the Ruska family that not only developed the EM, but also pioneered in the field of infections with pictures of bacteria and viruses. It took until 1949 until the cell’s internal structures were first shown when samples for the first time were embedded in plastic to enable thin sections and.

In early studies the focus was set on cellular organelles. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum were the first organelles to be described in greater detail. Brain tissue observations on a cellular structure were also started as a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) project. During the times of intense research using TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was only just beginning to appear as a tool for imaging surface topography, until it was brought to light in the 1960s and 1970s [1]. This blog should offer you some insights into recent projects involving SEM in cell biological applications.

Read more
Topics: Life Sciences

How scanning electron microscopy impacts dental studies

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Dec 14, 2017

Microscopy is known to be a versatile tool in dental studies. Not only is optical microscopy used in day-to-day practices in dental clinics, but due to the surface information electron microscopy offers, it is used within a large variety of research subjects. With the following examples we want to offer more insights into how in detail scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is utilized within various dental studies.

Microscopy is known to be a versatile tool in dental studies. Not only is optical microscopy used in day-to-day practices in dental clinics, but due to the surface information electron microscopy offers, it is used within a large variety of research subjects. With the following examples we want to offer more insights into how in detail scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is utilized within various dental studies.

Read more
Topics: Life Sciences

The strong connection between microscopy and micro-organisms

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Nov 30, 2017

The human body is host to billions of micro-organisms of many kinds and has as many human cells as non-human ones! These micro-organisms are mainly harmless bacteria; in fact, they can sometimes be helpful. Due to their size, a distinction and characterization is always done with microscopy. Over the many, many years that micro-organisms have been observed, different types of microscopy have been used, from classical optical microscopy to scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this blog, we showcase three examples of how micro-organisms were studied with the help of microscopy.

The human body is host to billions of micro-organisms of many kinds and has as many human cells as non-human ones! These micro-organisms are mainly harmless bacteria; in fact, they can sometimes be helpful. Due to their size, a distinction and characterization is always done with microscopy. Over the many, many years that micro-organisms have been observed, different types of microscopy have been used, from classical optical microscopy to scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this blog, we showcase three examples of how micro-organisms were studied with the help of microscopy.

Read more
Topics: Life Sciences

How does blood research benefit from scanning electron microscopy?

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Nov 16, 2017

Blood is a vital element of the body. It is essential to all organs and tissues as it provides the oxygen that is required and removes unwanted metabolites from cells. But blood isn’t just involved in oxygen transportation, it also contains immune cells and platelets that help defend the body from various diseases and are involved in bleeding disorders. This blog will give you more insights into how scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) can become an important tool for laboratories that focus on blood research and related fields.

Blood is a vital element of the body. It is essential to all organs and tissues as it provides the oxygen that is required and removes unwanted metabolites from cells. But blood isn’t just involved in oxygen transportation, it also contains immune cells and platelets that help defend the body from various diseases and are involved in bleeding disorders. This blog will give you more insights into how scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) can become an important tool for laboratories that focus on blood research and related fields.

Read more
Topics: Life Sciences

How are plant sciences and electron microscopy linked?

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Nov 3, 2017

In plant sciences, researchers face many different and challenging microscopy tasks: from morphological analysis to functional approaches, from taxonomy and ethology to physiology studies. All kinds of different microscopy techniques are used inside plant science. This blog offers you insights in how scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) are used and what benefits and challenges come with their use in anatomical studies and physiology, as well as in regard to plants components such as fibers.

In plant sciences, researchers face many different and challenging microscopy tasks: from morphological analysis to functional approaches, from taxonomy and ethology to physiology studies. All kinds of different microscopy techniques are used inside plant science. This blog offers you insights in how scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) are used and what benefits and challenges come with their use in anatomical studies and physiology, as well as in regard to plants components such as fibers.

Read more
Topics: Life Sciences

How SEM analysis helps understanding new nanofiber applications

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Oct 26, 2017

How to transfer drugs into human bodies efficient and while doing that minimizing side effects, has been studied intensively, and many different techniques have been developed over the past few years. Electrospun nanofibers are one of such new systems that have attracted a lot of attention recently. This is thanks to the exceptional properties of these fibers: they have highly porous three-dimensional surfaces, a high surface-to-volume ratio, and interconnected porosity with tunable pore dimensions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) proved to be helpful as an analytical tool to understand how fiber properties can be altered and enhanced.

 

How to transfer drugs into human bodies efficient and while doing that minimizing side effects, has been studied intensively, and many different techniques have been developed over the past few years. Electrospun nanofibers are one of such new systems that have attracted a lot of attention recently. This is thanks to the exceptional properties of these fibers: they have highly porous three-dimensional surfaces, a high surface-to-volume ratio, and interconnected porosity with tunable pore dimensions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) proved to be helpful as an analytical tool to understand how fiber properties can be altered and enhanced.

 

Read more

Press Room | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Disclaimer | Sitemap |