Blog

How-to: high-quality fiber analysis through proper SEM sample preparation

By Marijke Scotuzzi - Jan 18, 2018

Fibers are generally imaged in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), which provides high-resolution images, elemental analysis, and the possibility of automatically measuring thousands of fibers in mere minutes. But in some cases, imaging fibers with a SEM also presents challenges as the nature of some fibers might compromise the quality of your analysis. With this in mind, this blog describes how you can obtain high-quality imaging and fiber analysis through proper SEM configuration and sample preparation.

Fibers are generally imaged in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), which provides high-resolution images, elemental analysis, and the possibility of automatically measuring thousands of fibers in mere minutes. But in some cases, imaging fibers with a SEM also presents challenges as the nature of some fibers might compromise the quality of your analysis. With this in mind, this blog describes how you can obtain high-quality imaging and fiber analysis through proper SEM configuration and sample preparation.

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SEM & EDS: contamination detection and chemical composition analysis equipment

By Luigi Raspolini - Jan 12, 2018

Imperfections and small malfunctions in machines can sometimes cause contamination of the final products that roll off the production line. Metal particles can detach from the moving part of machines because of usage and friction and deposit on the product, sometimes compromising its quality irreversibly. This blog describes a technique that not only allows you to inspect for the presence of contamination, but also to identify its origination.

Imperfections and small malfunctions in machines can sometimes cause contamination of the final products that roll off the production line. Metal particles can detach from the moving part of machines because of usage and friction and deposit on the product, sometimes compromising its quality irreversibly. This blog describes a technique that not only allows you to inspect for the presence of contamination, but also to identify its origination.

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Topics: EDX

Automated scanning electron microscopy analysis: how it's used

By Ruud Bernsen - Jan 4, 2018

In my previous blog, I described how automating scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis saves researchers and operators valuable time. A lot of scanning electron microscope users use this for a wide range of purposes. This blog shows an example of how SEM automation is used in the field: it details performing an automated Laser-Induced Damage Threshold test (LIDT).


In my previous blog, I described how automating scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis saves researchers and operators valuable time. A lot of scanning electron microscope users use this for a wide range of purposes. This blog shows an example of how SEM automation is used in the field: it details performing an automated Laser-Induced Damage Threshold test (LIDT).


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How scanning electron microscopy is used for cell biology research

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Dec 28, 2017

Although the very first electron microscopy (EM) images of eukaryotic cells were attributed in 1945, it was the Ruska family that not only developed the EM, but also pioneered in the field of infections with pictures of bacteria and viruses. It took until 1949 until the cell’s internal structures were first shown when samples for the first time were embedded in plastic to enable thin sections and.

In early studies the focus was set on cellular organelles. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum were the first organelles to be described in greater detail. Brain tissue observations on a cellular structure were also started as a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) project. During the times of intense research using TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was only just beginning to appear as a tool for imaging surface topography, until it was brought to light in the 1960s and 1970s [1]. This blog should offer you some insights into recent projects involving SEM in cell biological applications.

Although the very first electron microscopy (EM) images of eukaryotic cells were attributed in 1945, it was the Ruska family that not only developed the EM, but also pioneered in the field of infections with pictures of bacteria and viruses. It took until 1949 until the cell’s internal structures were first shown when samples for the first time were embedded in plastic to enable thin sections and.

In early studies the focus was set on cellular organelles. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum were the first organelles to be described in greater detail. Brain tissue observations on a cellular structure were also started as a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) project. During the times of intense research using TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was only just beginning to appear as a tool for imaging surface topography, until it was brought to light in the 1960s and 1970s [1]. This blog should offer you some insights into recent projects involving SEM in cell biological applications.

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Topics: life sciences

Inside a scanning electron microscope: the SEM electron column explained

By Marijke Scotuzzi - Dec 21, 2017

Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) use an electron beam to image samples with a resolution down to the nanometer scale. The electrons are emitted from a filament and collimated into a beam in the electron source. The beam is then focused on the sample surface by a set of lenses in the electron column. How does an electron lens work? And which kind of lenses exist? How are lenses combined to form an electron column? In this blog, we will answer these questions and give a general insight into the working principle of an electron column.

Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) use an electron beam to image samples with a resolution down to the nanometer scale. The electrons are emitted from a filament and collimated into a beam in the electron source. The beam is then focused on the sample surface by a set of lenses in the electron column. How does an electron lens work? And which kind of lenses exist? How are lenses combined to form an electron column? In this blog, we will answer these questions and give a general insight into the working principle of an electron column.

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How scanning electron microscopy impacts dental studies

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Dec 14, 2017

Microscopy is known to be a versatile tool in dental studies. Not only is optical microscopy used in day-to-day practices in dental clinics, but due to the surface information electron microscopy offers, it is used within a large variety of research subjects. With the following examples we want to offer more insights into how in detail scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is utilized within various dental studies.

Microscopy is known to be a versatile tool in dental studies. Not only is optical microscopy used in day-to-day practices in dental clinics, but due to the surface information electron microscopy offers, it is used within a large variety of research subjects. With the following examples we want to offer more insights into how in detail scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is utilized within various dental studies.

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Topics: life sciences

How to prevent oxidative damage to a scanning electron microscope sample

By Luigi Raspolini - Dec 7, 2017

O2 is an extremely reactive gas, and some materials don’t get along well with it. Oxidation processes are activated as soon as certain samples are exposed to the atmosphere and this affects the structure and characteristics of the samples — in most cases permanently. This blog explains how such effects can be prevented and how SEM analysis can be performed on oxygen-sensitive samples without compromising the structure of the sample itself.

O2 is an extremely reactive gas, and some materials don’t get along well with it. Oxidation processes are activated as soon as certain samples are exposed to the atmosphere and this affects the structure and characteristics of the samples — in most cases permanently. This blog explains how such effects can be prevented and how SEM analysis can be performed on oxygen-sensitive samples without compromising the structure of the sample itself.

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The strong connection between microscopy and micro-organisms

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Nov 30, 2017

The human body is host to billions of micro-organisms of many kinds and has as many human cells as non-human ones! These micro-organisms are mainly harmless bacteria; in fact, they can sometimes be helpful. Due to their size, a distinction and characterization is always done with microscopy. Over the many, many years that micro-organisms have been observed, different types of microscopy have been used, from classical optical microscopy to scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this blog, we showcase three examples of how micro-organisms were studied with the help of microscopy.

The human body is host to billions of micro-organisms of many kinds and has as many human cells as non-human ones! These micro-organisms are mainly harmless bacteria; in fact, they can sometimes be helpful. Due to their size, a distinction and characterization is always done with microscopy. Over the many, many years that micro-organisms have been observed, different types of microscopy have been used, from classical optical microscopy to scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this blog, we showcase three examples of how micro-organisms were studied with the help of microscopy.

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Topics: life sciences

The role of the electron beam voltage in scanning electron microscopy

By Luigi Raspolini - Nov 23, 2017

When conducting electron microscopy (EM) analysis, there are a few important parameters that must be taken into account to produce the best possible results, and to image the feature of interest. One of the crucial roles is played by the voltage (or tension) applied to the source electrodes to generate the electron beam. Historically, the trend has always been to increase the voltage to improve the resolution of the system.

It is only in recent years that scanning electron microscope (SEM) producers have started to focus on improving the resolution at lower voltages. A major role in this has been the expanding field of application of EM to the life sciences - especially after the introduction of the Nobel prize-winning cryo-SEM technique. This blog will focus on the effects of the voltage on the results of the analysis.

When conducting electron microscopy (EM) analysis, there are a few important parameters that must be taken into account to produce the best possible results, and to image the feature of interest. One of the crucial roles is played by the voltage (or tension) applied to the source electrodes to generate the electron beam. Historically, the trend has always been to increase the voltage to improve the resolution of the system.

It is only in recent years that scanning electron microscope (SEM) producers have started to focus on improving the resolution at lower voltages. A major role in this has been the expanding field of application of EM to the life sciences - especially after the introduction of the Nobel prize-winning cryo-SEM technique. This blog will focus on the effects of the voltage on the results of the analysis.

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How does blood research benefit from scanning electron microscopy?

By Dr. Jasmin Zahn - Nov 16, 2017

Blood is a vital element of the body. It is essential to all organs and tissues as it provides the oxygen that is required and removes unwanted metabolites from cells. But blood isn’t just involved in oxygen transportation, it also contains immune cells and platelets that help defend the body from various diseases and are involved in bleeding disorders. This blog will give you more insights into how scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) can become an important tool for laboratories that focus on blood research and related fields.

Blood is a vital element of the body. It is essential to all organs and tissues as it provides the oxygen that is required and removes unwanted metabolites from cells. But blood isn’t just involved in oxygen transportation, it also contains immune cells and platelets that help defend the body from various diseases and are involved in bleeding disorders. This blog will give you more insights into how scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) can become an important tool for laboratories that focus on blood research and related fields.

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Topics: life sciences

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